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Mr Darren Le Roux

My PHD research is based in Canberra, ACT focusing on three broad objectives:

1. Measuring the availability of vegetative resources (e.g. mature trees, hollows, woody debris) across dominant land use types, including nature reserves (semi-natural landscapes); grazed pastureland; and urban 'green space' (human modified landscapes).

2. Measuring the biodiversity value of native trees of varying sizes (small, medium and large trees) situated in different landscape contexts (urban, pasture, and reserve). 

3. Conducting a balanced field based experiment to test if artificial nest boxes are valid biodiversity offset and mitigation tools.  

For more details on each project, please click read more.

1. Measuring the availability of vegetative resources (e.g. mature trees, hollows, woody debris) across dominant land use types, including nature reserves (semi-natural landscapes); grazed pastureland; and urban 'green space' (human modified landscapes). Fieldwork involves standard plot survey techniques. This research is anticipated to better inform current resource management and conservation practices.

2. Measuring the biodiversity value of native trees of varying sizes (small, medium and large trees) situated in different landscape contexts (urban, pasture, and reserve). This involves quantifying both the structural profile of sample trees (e.g. DBH, height, % dead branches in canopy) as well as the wildlife responses associated with each tree. Wildlife measures, include bird abundance and richness; bat activity and richness; and invertebrate availability and richness. This research can be used to better inform tree retention, planting and offsetting strategies and thereby more strategic wildlife conservation measures.

3. Conducting a balanced field based experiment to test if artificial nest boxes are valid biodiversity offset and mitigation tools. This will involve securing nest boxes with 6 different entrance sizes (20, 35, 55, 75, 95, 105mm; hollow level) on trees of 3 different size class (small, medium and large tree; tree level) situated in 4 different landscape contexts (reserves, pasture, urban parks and urban matrix; landscape level). Fauna occupancy of nest boxes will be determined using an inspection camera technique over a 24 month period. This experimental design will provide valuable information about how different hollow-using species and animal groups respond to these three interacting variables. These data can be used to provide more clear recommendations to managers and conservation groups currently using or wishing to use nest boxes as biodiversity offsets

Listing Details

Position
PhD Student
Member of project(s)
5.5.~ Click on themes & projects menu for project details
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